Eat the Desert: Elderberry

Written by: Emma Jones

Elderberry is a plant closely rooted to human development. With several varieties found across the globe, many communities have used its flowers and berries for medicinal and culinary purposes for hundreds of years. Though there are many types of Elderberry, the one that grows especially well in the Southwest is the Mexican Elderberry (Sambucus mexicana). Reaching 15 feet tall in maturity, it can be used in residential or commercial design as a shrub or tree. With its beautiful cream colored flowers in spring and summer and it’s dark purple fruit in fall, Mexican Elderberry can become a valuable addition to any space.

In addition to its aesthetic appeal, the fruit and flowers of the Elderberry provide numerous health benefits. The berries are high in nutrients and antioxidants which help reduce inflammation, reduce damage from oxidative stress, and protect the body against free radicals from pollution. Multiple studies have also shown that Elderberry flower infusions and berry extracts aid in helping the body fight against influenza virus and soothe symptoms. Elderberry extract lozenges were found to reduce symptoms like headaches, fever, body aches, and congestion in 24 hours of consuming. Repeated doses of Elderberry syrup boosted symptom recovery in 2-4 days. These remedies can be used as a natural alternative to other commercial medicines available to treat influenza and the common cold.

In food, Elderberry can be used in jellies, pies, and homemade wine. It is important to note that before consuming, berries should be cooked to help the body digest them better. Here at the gardens we look forward to turning our Elderberries into syrup and the flowers in homemade loose leaf tea! If you don’t have an Elderberry tree in your backyard, look into local foraging laws in your area to determine if harvesting Elderberry in public spaces is a viable option for you. Whether it’s in medicine or food, Elderberry is definitely a multipurpose beauty!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Emma Jones is a student at Utah State University studying Conservation and Restoration Ecology with a double minor in Sustainable Systems and Sociology. Beans and rice speak to her soul and she attempts yoga on a regular basis.

Sources:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/elderberry#bottom-line

http://omicron-pharma.com/pdfs/ElderberryClinicalOJPK_Published.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15080016

http://www.herbalpedia.com/ELDER,%20MEXICAN.pdf

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